H-5 Wet Weather Pump Station

Background

9th and Madison Streets in Hoboken at
10:45 a.m. on December 9, 2014.  This flooding will be alleviated, if not eliminated, by the new H-5 Wet Weather Pump Station.

The City of Hoboken has been beset by wet weather and tidal flooding since the mid-19th century. It was only after the establishment of the North Hudson Sewerage Authority in 1988 that the issue of flood management and prevention was examined seriously and given priority. The Authority’s approach was to address wet weather flooding with a sequential strategy that dealt with the worst hit neighborhoods in priority order. The top priority areas were the southwestern and northwestern sections of the City.

Wet weather flooding in Hoboken is a result of a combination of factors: severe rainfall in a concentrated period of time, high tides in the Hudson River, and low lying street levels. This combination prevents storm water from draining through the sewers and outfall pipes into the Hudson. With no way to exit to the river, storm water fills the sewer lines and backs on to the streets in the lowest lying areas of the City. Wet weather pump stations enable the storm water to be pumped against the tide, forcing the flow into the Hudson and preventing street flooding.

For decades, the worst affected area of the City was its southwestern neighborhood. The Authority built the H-1 pump station in 2011 which has effectively eliminated significant flooding in an area that was chronically underwater during severe rain storms at high tides. The second worst impacted area of the City is the northwestern neighborhood from 8th to 11th Streets, west of Clinton Avenue, also known as the Authority’s H-5 drainage area. This includes a wide area around the Shop Rite store.

In order to address this problem, a new wet weather pump station must be built in the H-5 drainage area. Since the pump station must be in the H-5 drainage area, then it must be built along the Eleventh Street H-5 outfall, downstream (east) of the solids/floatable facility under the intersection of Eleventh and Hudson Street. Only a pump sited in the H-5 drainage area, along the Eleventh Street outfall, can alleviate the flooding in this section of the northwest, which is now the worst area of flooding in the City.

The H5 Wet Weather Pump Station includes the following elements:

  • A below-grade 40 mgd pump station
  • A below-grade transition vault
  • A below-grade electrical vault
  • An emergency 725 kW generator

The existing combined sewer outfall (CSO) for the H5 service area discharges by gravity into the Hudson River at the foot of 11th Street, however during periods of heavy precipitation in the service area and/or high tides, flow is restricted causing upstream flooding. To alleviate flooding, the H5 Wet Weather Pump Station will pump flow to the Hudson River when conditions exist that prevent gravity flow. The pump station and transition vault are located within the 100‑year flood plain and will operate irrespective of street flooding in, around, and on top of the H5 Wet Weather Pump Station. To meet both spatial and aesthetic limitations, all the necessary infrastructure for the pump station, transition vault, and electrical vault are located below grade with access from at-grade hatches.

The benefits of the H-5 WWPS are evident:

  • Reduction, if not elimination, of wet weather flooding in the northwestern section of the City;
  • Protection of the PSE&G substation that powers Hoboken neighborhoods as far east as the Hudson River;
  • Contribution to the comprehensive Hoboken flood management plan (Rebuild by Design) as an integral part of the strategy to deal with Sandy-type events and limit potential increases in flood insurance costs for Hoboken residents.

Construction Updates: Turning the Tide Newsletters

2016

October 21, 2016 September 15, 2016 September 8, 2016

August 5, 2016

June 14, 2016

May 12, 2016

April 12, 2016

March 17, 2016

February 26, 2016

January 11, 2016
   

2015

December 18, 2015

December 14, 2015

December 7, 2015

November 16, 2015

November 12, 2015

November 3, 2015

October 27, 2015

October 19, 2015

October 13, 2015

October 2, 2015

 

September 25, 2015

September 18, 2015

September 11, 2015

September 4, 2015

 

August 28, 2015

August 21, 2015

August 14, 2015

August 7, 2015

 

July 31, 2015

July 23, 2015

July 10, 2015

June 19, 2015

Weekly H-5 Air Monitoring Report

LSRP Report: Data for Week of September 12, 2016

The air monitoring for the H5 WWPS project continued during the last week as work progressed on the control vault and pump station work areas. There were no exceedances of VOCs and dust for the week of September 12th.  With all open excavations completed as of Friday, September 16th, air monitoring at the site was discontinued effective close of business Friday.

LSRP Report: Data for Week of August 29, 2016

The air monitoring for the H5 WWPS project continues as work progresses on the control vault and pump station work areas. There were no exceedances of VOCs and dust for the week of August 29th.

LSRP Report: Data for Week of August 22, 2016

The air monitoring for the H5 WWPS project continues as work progresses on the control vault and pump station work areas. There were no exceedances of VOCs and dust for the week of August 22nd.

LSRP Report: Data for Week of August 15, 2016

The air monitoring for the H5 WWPS project continues as work progresses on the control vault and pump station work areas. There were no exceedances of VOCs and dust for the week of August 15th.

Presentation

NHSA Presentation on H-5 WWPS (June 8, 2015)

North Hudson Sewerage Authority Storm Water Management Improvement Project: H5 Wet Weather Pump Station

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Traffic Control Plan (July 21, 2015)

H-5 Wet Weather Pump Station FAQs

Additional H-5 Wet Weather Pump Station FAQs (January 20, 2015)

Decibel Levels of Four Mitsubishi AC Units

Additional H-5 Wet Weather Pump Station FAQs (February 23, 2015)

NJDEP and Other Documents

Maxwell Place Block F Deed Notice. Deed restriction entered into on November 21, 2011 by the property owner P.T. Maxwell based on a NJDEP-approved remedial action plan. The report identifies the contaminants that were on the site, those that were removed, and those that were capped. Exhibit B-1-1 indicates that, in the area that the H-5 WWPS will be built, there were minimal ground contaminants. The deed restriction also outlines the regular reporting required of the property owners (P.T. Maxwell or its successor owners) by the NJDEP. It also requires that any alterations to the site, including that which will occur with the construction of the H-5 WWPS, be approved by the NJDEP.

Sampling Plan DrawingThis document, which was completed at the time of the original clean-up of the Maxwell House coffee facility site, shows the ground contaminants and the areas and depths of soil excavation for remediation. The SPD indicates that minimal contaminants existed at the time of the original remediation in the areas sited for the construction of the H-5 WWPS.

USEPA Phoenix Award for Environmental Remediation. In 2011, the U.S. EPA recognized the Maxwell House site as an outstanding brownfields redevelopment by presenting its owners with the prestigious Phoenix Award. This document discusses the clean-up, its challenges and results.




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North Hudson Sewerage Authority, 1600 Adams St., Hoboken, NJ 07030
Email: info@nhudsonsa.com Phone: 201.963.6043 Fax: 201.963.3782

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